Comcast contributes $5 million to establish innovative media center

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Architectural rendering of the new Comcast Media and Technology Center, located in the Tivoli Student Union.

 

The University of Colorado Denver has announced the launch of the Comcast Media and Technology Center, a new academic facility made possible by a cash and in-kind contribution from Comcast Cable valued at $5 million.

The multidisciplinary academic center located in the Tivoli Student Union is a partnership between Comcast and CU Denver’s College of Engineering and Applied Science and  College of Arts & Media. The Comcast Media and Technology Center will be a place for students, researchers, Comcast employees, and the greater community to work together to develop new technologies and learn from one another, such as the new program in Computer Graphics and Visual Effects.

Read the CU Today story.
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CVEN alum Tyler Huggins selected to participate in the Chain Reaction Innovations program

On December 20, U.S. Secretary of Energy Ernest Moniz announced that CU Denver CVEN alum, Tyler Huggins (MS, Environmental Engineering/Sustainability Engineering, ‘12), has been selected as one of the first innovators to participate in a new embedded entrepreneurship program at the Department of Energy’s Argonne National Laboratory.

The Chain Reaction Innovations program is part of a new initiative to accelerate the development of sustainable and energy-efficient technologies and drive manufacturing growth by helping startups and innovators reduce development costs and risks. A panel of judges selected the inaugural cohort of five Chain Reactions innovators from more than 100 applications.

Tyler and Justin Whiteley, his business partner at their energy startup Emergy, have developed a process that uses a biological organism cultivated in brewery wastewater to create the carbon-based materials needed to make energy storage cells, including those used in cars: http://www.thetruthaboutcars.com/2016/11/beer-power-electric-car/

Tyler and Justin’s term at Chain Reaction Innovations is designed to help them bring this technology to market.

A summary of the technology: Emergy has developed a versatile biomanufacturing process to make low cost advanced porous carbon materials for energy storage and filtration applications. Emergy’s platform technology utilizes the efficient biomechanics of filamentous organisms to produce tunable material properties through a bottom-up approach. The use of a robust biological system also allows for the utilization of waste carbon sources such as industrial wastewater as a renewable feedstock. Ultimately, this process facilitates low cost and sustainable manufacturing of porous carbon materials with select characteristics directed towards specific applications. For example, Emergy can produce low cost, high surface area, pure carbon electrodes for supercapacitors from the treatment of brewery wastewater.

Smith awarded NIH Pathway to Independence Award (R00) from the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute

bradford-smith-head-shotDr. Bradford Smith, Assistant Professor in the Department of Bioengineering was awarded $747,000 over three years to study The Importance of Inhomogeneity in the Pathogenesis of Lung Injury (NIH R00 HL128944). This work is motivated by Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), a condition that causes more deaths per year than breast or prostate cancer. Treatment for ARDS is based around supportive mechanical ventilation, but this can cause ventilator-induced lung injury (VILI) and worsen outcomes. The major obstacle to developing personalized mechanical ventilation strategies that prevent VILI is an incomplete understanding of the microscale fluid-mechanical forces responsible for injury. In the proposed research, Dr. Smith will investigate the role of alveolar interdependence in the parenchymal stress balance and VILI pathogenesis. A detailed understanding of the stresses and strains that cause VILI will improve the treatment of ARDS and thus reduce mortality for a significant number of people.