Urban Street Design class tours the city with Bike Denver

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On Thursday, September 14, Bike Denver took the CVEN 5800 Urban Street Design class around Denver on a City Spin tour. They toured several bike lanes, including the new Broadway two-way cycle track and the Cherry Creek bike trail. Part of the tour included a light rail transit stop and how the bike-train connection works at that location.

The class is currently studying bicycle transportation and design, and this “first-hand view” along with bicycle advocates will hopefully influence their future designs.

The class was also joined by Steve Smith of RTD (former CU-Denver student) and Emily Cushman of the City/County of Denver (also a former CU-Denver student). Regular Bike Denver participants and other CU-Denver students joined the tour as well.

Three students receive prestigious ARCS scholarships

Three College of Engineering and Applied Science students have been awarded 2017 ARCS scholarships: Aaron Buchanan, bioengineering; Scott Spurgeon, mechanical engineering; and Rachelle Walter, bioengineering. These scholarships are awarded by the Colorado Chapter of the Achievement Rewards for College Scientists (ARCS) Foundation, which has partnerships with all four University of Colorado campuses, Colorado State University and Colorado School of Mines.

ARCS began in 1958 with a group of women volunteers who understood the importance of scholarship funding in supporting science students who want to make a difference. In September 1958, ARCS Foundation’s goal was officially announced to “. . . raise money for scholarships and fellowships (now known as Scholar Awards) . . . for the support of both undergraduate and graduate students.” Today, ARCS Foundation has 1,300 members in 15 chapters across the United States and has supported more than 9,600 graduate students in a variety of science fields with awards totaling almost $100 million.

ARCS scholarship recipients go through a very competitive selection process, and are selected based on their excellent academic performance and research experience. Buchanan and Walter are first-year graduate students; Spurgeon is a second-year undergraduate student.

Congratulations to Aaron, Scott and Rachelle!

Banaei-Kashani and team receive NIH R21 award

CUD_7-18_ENG_041__D3_6259Farnoush Banaei-Kahani, assistant professor of computer science and engineering, and a team of researchers have received an NIH R21 award for their proposal “Omics Data Integration to Identify Disease Pathways in COPD.” This is a two-year award for $275K with equal support for the three PIs and up to two post-docs with potential for R01 funding in the next phase.

The team consists of:

  • Katerina Kechris (PI), Associate Professor, Biostatistics, Colorado School of Public Health
  • Farnoush Banaei-Kashani (Co-PI), Assistant Professor, Computer Science and Engineering, University of Colorado Denver
  • Russ Bowler (Co-PI), Professor, Precision Medicine, National Jewish Health

Congratulations!

Mays, Roane receive NSF INCLUDES award

David Mays, associate professor of civil engineering, and Timberley Roane, associate professor of integrated biology, received one of 27 National Science Foundation INCLUDES (Inclusion across the Nation of Communities of Learners of Underrepresented Discoverers in Engineering and Science) award for their project “Building a Network for Education and Employment in Environmental Stewardship of Indigenous Lands.” NSF INCLUDES awards aim to enhance U.S. leadership in STEM discoveries and innovations through a commitment to diversity and inclusion. This is the second year of awards for INCLUDES, one of NSF’s “10 Big Ideas for Future NSF Investments.”

ABSTRACT:

For the United States to maintain its leading role on the world economic stage, it is essential to strengthen the American workforce in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM). Our current prosperity and our future success hinge on recruiting, training, and employing the creative and industrious STEM professionals who drive the innovation economy. Strengthening the American STEM workforce depends, in part, on broadening participation to students from demographics that have traditionally been underrepresented in STEM. This NSF INCLUDES Launch Pilot project will foster recruitment, training, and employment for indigenous STEM students, where the term “indigenous” comprises the terms Native American, American Indian, Alaskan Native, and Hawaiian Native. Specifically, this project will support the design and development of a first-of-its-kind network focused on environmental stewardship of indigenous lands. The network will comprise both tribal and government partners and will be organized by three faculty at the University of Colorado-Denver. Student recruitment, training, and employment will be organized around the unifying principle of land stewardship. The focus on land stewardship has been selected not only because it demands the expertise of STEM professionals, but also because land stewardship is among the top motivations for indigenous students considering STEM careers. Accordingly, this work is important on several fronts: It addresses the recognized need for STEM professionals; it broadens participation to students from underrepresented groups; and it provides a test bed for collective action by a first-of-its-kind network of tribal, government, and university partners.

The proposed network will work together to design, deploy, and debug a unique educational program giving students an opportunity to train for employment as tribal liaisons in the environmental field. In particular, this program will address the need for culturally-sensitive, scientifically-trained individuals who can serve as tribal liaisons between tribal and non-tribal organizations, which will allow them to prevent, minimize, or manage environmental incidents through their understanding of STEM principles and organizational dynamics. All students in this educational program will earn a regular four-year STEM degree, but a key feature of the program is that they will also participate in training and internships designed to provide background with nontechnical matters such as cultural awareness, environmental regulations, and organizational dynamics. Additionally, this educational program is designed to support recruitment of indigenous students by (1) providing a clear vision of a high-impact, culturally-relevant professional career and by (2) providing a cultural connection with obtaining a college degree. Taken together, the network aims to increase enrollment, retention, graduation, and alumni activity by indigenous students. Best practices and strategies for collective impact will be used to document achievement of the network in increasing the enrollment, retention, graduation, and alumni activity of indigenous students in higher education and in STEM careers. Continuous feedback will be collected to assess partner engagement and durability, and student satisfaction, performance, and progress. The network is expected to be sustainable because it addresses a demonstrated need; it is expected to be scalable because scientifically aware, culturally-sensitive individuals who can serve as tribal liaisons are needed not only regionally, but nationally.

Read more about NSF INCLUDES.

Congratulations David and Timberley.

Bioengineering hosts first-ever BOLT program

This August the department of Bioengineering hosted its first ever Bioengineering Opportunities and Leadership Training (BOLT) for high school students. 25 students from around the metro area participated in the week’s activities, which ranged from building an optical heart rate monitor and learning about tissue engineering to visiting the Children’s Hospital Gait Lab and Center for Surgical Innovation. The objective of the camp was to expose students to the many different facets of bioengineering and to get them excited about what a career as a biomedical engineer could look like. At the conclusion of the week students presented their rough prototypes of new designs for medical devices that could help a pediatrician before enjoying an ice cream social with the students and faculty of the BIOE Department.

Martinez named Haselden March MVP

image002Lauren Martinez, a recent graduate of the construction engineering and management program, was named Haselden Construction’s March MVP. She was nominated by members of the UCHealth Longs Peak project team because of her tireless efforts assisting the entire team with quality assurance/quality control, punchlist, and general issues that come up every day on-site.

Haselden MVPs are nominated by their peers and selected based on the following combination of company values, entrepreneurial spirit, and core behaviors: Entrepreneurial Spirit, Action, Humility, Passion, Bravery, Adaptability and Vulnerability.

From the nomination letter: Lauren not only pioneered utilization of QR codes with BIM 360 at Haselden, she also worked diligently with the owner, design team, her fellow Haselden team mates, and the BIM 360 help desk to ensure the system flowed seamlessly. Due to her efforts, punchlist on this 220,000 SF building is being recorded and completed in record time. The UCHealth Haselden team has received numerous compliments from the owner and the design team regarding the efficiency and organization of the punchlist process, and this is due in large part to Lauren’s efforts.

Not only are the QR codes being utilized for punchlist, they will remain in place after turnover of the building so that the owner can walk up to a room, scan the QR code, and pull up relevant information regarding the equipment in the room and any QC, maintenance, or warranty issues within that space.

Congratulations!

 

Benninger and Yakacki awarded tenure

The University of Colorado Board of Regents approved tenure appointments for two College of Engineering and Applied Science faculty:

  • Richard Benninger, bioengineering
  • Christopher Yakacki, mechanical engineering

In addition, the Regents approved the appointment of Martin Dunn as the new college dean (effective January 1, 2018), who will also join the mechanical engineering department.

Congratulations on this achievement.