Marshall, Henao’s ride-share research finds a reduction in parking demand

Civil engineering associate professor Wes Marshall and PhD graduate Alejandro Henao have found that cities are seeing a reduction in parking demand as a result of more people using ride-share services like Lyft and Uber. This research was featured in CU Denver Today and in the Denver Post.

Read more in CU Denver Today.
Read the story in the Denver Post.

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Clevenger weighs in on construction timeline for President Trump’s proposed wall

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Associate Professor Caroline Clevenger

A recent story posted by CNBC turns to experts for their insight about the proposed construction timeline for President Trump’s proposed controversial border wall. Civil engineering associate professor Caroline Clevenger was one of those experts, citing not just the timeline but the logistics of getting materials and labor in place to actually construct the wall.

Read the CNBC story here.

Kim receives ACI Chester Paul Siess Award for Excellence in Structural Research

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Professor Jimmy Kim

Civil engineering professor Jimmy Kim has received the 2019 American Concrete Institute’s Chester Paul Siess Award for Excellence in Structural Research specifically for the behavior of reinforced concrete beams strengthened with carbon fiber-reinforced polymer (CFRP) sheets subjected to relaxation induced by simultaneous thermal and mechanical loadings”, as co-author of the paper titled “Thermomechanical Relaxation of CFRP Sheets Bonded to a Concrete Substrate.”

Kim’s award will be mentioned at the ACI Spring 2019 Concrete Convention and Exposition during the Opening Session and Keynote Presentation, Sunday, March 24, 2019, in Québec City, Canada.

Congratulations, Jimmy!

CU Denver has record-breaking participation in the American Geophysical Union

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Lunch at Matchbox Pizza near Chinatown. Left-to-right: Poorya Hosseini, Allison Goodwell, Chad Renick, Laurna Kaatz, Eric Roth, Maryam Pournasiri Poshtiri, Eric Thomas, and David Mays. Not pictured: Mark Golkowski.

CU Denver’s College of Engineering and Applied Science sent its largest-ever delegation of faculty, students and alumni to the Fall Meeting of the American Geophysical Union. This meeting, held in Washington, DC December 10 – 14, 2018, brought together more than 28,500 scientists studying all aspects of the earth and environmental sciences.

This record-breaking group comprised civil engineering faculty Allison Goodwell and David Mays, who presented their hydrology research with students Laurna Kaatz and Eric Thomas, and alumni Maryam Pournasiri Poshtiri and Eric Roth. The group also included electrical engineering faculty Mark Golkowski with students Poorya Hossini and Chad Renick, who presented research on atmospheric electricity and space science. Mays also presented his NSF-sponsored work on Environmental Stewardship of Indigenous Lands.

Renick also was honored with an Outstanding Student Presentation Award for his poster, LWPC Modeling of Lightning Induced Changes in D-Region Electron Density, coauthored with Golkowski and Sandeep Sarker and Georgia Tech’s Morris Cohen. This coveted award recognizes the top few percent among literally thousands of student research presentations. Congratulations, Chad!

Jacot’s research highlighted by Children’s Hospital Colorado Foundation, NSF Science Nation

Bioengineering associate professor Jeffrey Jacot’s research in regenerative medicine and his work with the Children’s Colorado Heart Institute was recently featured by the Children’s Hospital Colorado Foundation. Jacot and other Children’s Colorado physician-scientists are on the brink of new breakthroughs in regenerative medicine that could radically change the way we repair congenital heart defects. This promising area of research seeks to repair or replace damaged tissue with living, functional cells.

Read the Children’s Colorado story here.

Watch the NSF video here.

Clevenger shares insight in the Colorado Convention Center construction contract scandal

CU Test
Associate professor Caroline Clevenger

In a December 16 article, CU Denver Civil Engineering associate professor Caroline Clevenger shares insight with The Denver Post as a neutral expert in the Colorado Convention Center construction contract scandal.

Denver’s plan to expand the Colorado Convention Center is supposed to draw nearly $50 million of annual spending to the city, but this could be delayed or threatened by recent allegations of “collusion” by private companies on the construction projects.

Read the Denver Post story here.

Bodine leads panel for the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering and Medicine

bodine-panelOn October 24, Cathy Bodine, associate professor of bioengineering and director of Assistive Technology Partners, moderated a panel for the National Academy of Engineering, Medicine and Science on the use of artificial intelligence to create smart cities for persons with disabilities and the elderly in Washington, DC.

Key topic areas included housing, transportation and interfaces with AI.

Panelists included:
Victor Calise, New York City’s Mayor’s Office for People with Disabilities
Henry Claypool, UCSF Community Living Policy Center
Jon Sanford, Georgia Tech School of Industrial Design
Gwo-Wei Torng, U.S Department of Transportation

Faculty receive $4.5M DARPA grant for Subterranean Challenge

Researchers from CU Denver, CU Boulder and Boston-based Scientific Systems Company have partnered to design drones that can explore underground environments like subway tunnels, mines and caves.

The U.S. Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) awarded the team a $4.5 million grant to support its participation in its national Subterranean Challenge, which will end in fall 2021. The partners will compete against five other funded teams across the country to complete three increasingly difficult underground challenges.

The CU Denver team includes Ron Rorrer, associate professor of mechanical engineering, Mark Golkowski and Jaedo Park, associate professors of electrical engineering, Chao Liu and Vijay Harid, assistant professors of electrical engineering, and Diane Williams, research associate of electrical engineering.

Read more about the project here.

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