Mays Edits Special Issue of Open-Access Journal Water

David-Mays- (10-2014)-webCivil engineering associate professor David Mays has been appointed co-editor for a special issue of Water, focused on groundwater contamination and remediation:

http://www.mdpi.com/journal/water/special_issues/Groundwater_Contamination_Remediation

Mays will be co-editing this special issue with Tim Scheibe of Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. Mays writes, “We hope to solicit a nice group of papers within the broad field of groundwater contamination and remediation, including (but not limited to) processes controlling contaminant sources, transport, and fate in the subsurface; methods to identify the concentration and extent of contaminant plumes; and novel approaches to predict and enhance the performance of remediation techniques.”

Water is a peer-reviewed journal published by Multidisciplinary Digital Publishing Institute (MDPI) of Basel, Switzerland and indexed on the Web of Science. Water will be accepting manuscript submissions this special issue through Wednesday 6/20/2018.

Yakacki’s tech startup wins big at NFL 1st and Future competition

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Associate Professor Chris Yakacki, far right, receives a $50,000 check for winning the technology category in the NFL’s ‘1st and Future’ competition. Pictured from far left are Russell Wilson, Seattle Seahawks quarterback; Carl Frick, Yakacki’s co-founder of Impressio; NFL Commissioner Roger Goodell; Chairman of NBC Broadcasting and Sports Mark Lazarus; President and CEO of the Mayo Clinic John Noseworthy; and Yakacki.

Chris Yakacki, associate professor of mechanical engineering, and his tech startup company Impressio, Inc. won the Advancements for Protective Equipment category at the NFL’s “1st and Future” competition last Saturday for inventing a liquid-crystal foam technology to improve the safety of football helmets. The advanced material is better than legacy materials at absorbing forces of impact that can cause concussions and brain damage, a major issue for the league. He and his colleague Carl Frick, University of Wyoming, won $50,000 to support their research and tickets to the Super Bowl.

Read the NFL press release.
Read the CU Denver Today story.
Read the C|NET story.
Read the Denver Business Journal story.
Watch the Fox31 report.

Congratulations!

Kim inaugurated president of the Bridge Engineering Institute

jimmy kim2015Jimmy Kim, professor of civil engineering has been inaugurated as president of the Bridge Engineering Institute (BEI), an international technical society. BEI is a non-profit, non-political and non-biased organization consisting of the executive committee and the international advisory committee, including world-class researchers and engineers in the area of bridge engineering and related fields. The objectives of BEI are to advance the knowledge of bridge engineering and related fields, to promote the state of the art, to foster young professionals who will lead tomorrow’s technology, and to provide a forum for international cooperation.

Kim’s research interests encompass advanced composite materials for rehabilitation, structural informatics, complex systems, and science-based structural engineering, including statistical, interfacial, and quantum physics. He is the chair of two national technical committees and participates in developing several design specifications and guidelines to transfer research into practice. Kim is an elected Fellow of American Concrete Institute (ACI) and elected Council Member of the International Institute for FRP in Construction (IIFC), and serves as an Associate Editor/Editorial Board Member for two international journals.

Rens and team featured in CU Today

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How does one become the engineer of record on dozens of Denver’s infrastructure rehabilitation projects?

For Civil Engineering Professor Kevin Rens, PhD, PE – and the many students he’s mentored in both the classroom and the field – it’s quite simple. It comes down to loving the minutiae of the craft – identifying each crack in the pavement, rating the structural integrity of every component, and planning in precise detail the path to a longer life for bridges, streets, sidewalks, curbs and just about anything else that makes up Denver’s road system.

Read the entire CU Today story here.

Fall 2017 Senior Design Recap and Slideshow

The fall senior design event was a smashing success with 29 teams, nearly 100 students and almost 20 judges participating. Below is the list of winners:

Read the recap from University Communications.

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Jacot lab, research featured in NSF video

The National Science Foundation has produced a video on associate professor of bioengineering Jeffrey Jacot’s research and work being done at Children’s Hospital Colorado. The video, titled Bioengineering infant heart patches with the baby’s own heart cells, is posted on the NSF YouTube site, the NSF Science360 News Service, as well as NSF social media platforms.

Watch the video here.

Mays Teaches Hydrology to 2nd Graders in Denver

On Friday 10/6/2017, civil engineering associate professor David Mays led a hydrology field trip for Ms. Sara Goodwin’s 2nd grade class at Park Hill Elementary School here in Denver. The field trip reinforced the students’ prior learning about maps, directions, and scales while introducing the basics of urban hydrology: storm water flows downhill, enters a storm drain, and then flows through storm sewers that are accessible by manholes. The field trip to Ferguson Park culminated in a flood when Mays, outfitted for safety in a CU Denver hard hat, dumped 35 gallons of water from a pre-loaded garbage can graciously loaned by STEM-supporting neighbors Amy, Dennis, and Tomá.

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By Robert Lawton – Robert Lawton, CC BY-SA 2.5, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=1243835

 

 

CU Denver Today: First bioengineering undergraduates are prepared for the future

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“We were all in it together.”

That’s how Jacob Altholz, a recent CU Denver graduate, remembers his experience in the undergraduate bioengineering program, which is part of the College of Engineering and Applied Science with upper division courses taught on CU Anschutz Medical Campus. Jacob and 14 of his classmates are the first group of students to graduate from the program, which is the first of its kind in Colorado.

His fellow classmate, Rachelle Walter, also remembers how much she enjoyed learning how to work together. The program created a cohesive environment that allowed students to work closely with one another and make friendships to last a lifetime.

Read about their experiences in the CU Denver Today story.

Urban Street Design class tours the city with Bike Denver

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On Thursday, September 14, Bike Denver took the CVEN 5800 Urban Street Design class around Denver on a City Spin tour. They toured several bike lanes, including the new Broadway two-way cycle track and the Cherry Creek bike trail. Part of the tour included a light rail transit stop and how the bike-train connection works at that location.

The class is currently studying bicycle transportation and design, and this “first-hand view” along with bicycle advocates will hopefully influence their future designs.

The class was also joined by Steve Smith of RTD (former CU-Denver student) and Emily Cushman of the City/County of Denver (also a former CU-Denver student). Regular Bike Denver participants and other CU-Denver students joined the tour as well.